sharing a kitchen with roommates

Split It: How To Share Treats

By | Apartments, Drinks, Food, Renting, Roommates

Photo Cred If you’ve ever googled, “How to share a kitchen with your roommate”, you probably read articles on sharing chores. Not many of these articles talk about the most important part – treats. From sharing food, to cooking food, we’re breaking down the top three kitchen rules for roommates when it comes to food and sharing it. 1. Roommate food sharing list Photo Cred It may seem petty, but creating a roommate food sharing list is a total must. This is a list of kitchen treats that are shareable between all in the apartment. Things not included in this list are clearly off limits. If this is unclear for some reason, create a separate, “Do Not Touch” list. Place these lists on the fridge and pantry. While labeling your items help, having a “Sorry I Touched It” money jar can help you and your roommates stay accountable during times temptation takes over. 2. Roommate cooking schedule Photo Cred One chef in the kitchen is great, two chefs in the kitchen can start to feel claustrophobic and we all know what they say about threes. Scheduling or asking for meal prep/cooking time in the kitchen can help reduce many kitchen catastrophes. 3. Sharing a fridge with roommates Photo Cred This may be the most important rule of them all. Considered the holy place for all things cold and stored, the fridge. Remember these three things when it comes to sharing the fridge. If it smells foul, throw it away. If it’s…

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Moving Boxes

7 Signs You’re Ready To Live On Your Own

By | Houston, Roommates

There comes a time in one’s life when the urge to have your own place fills your every waking thought–like, after your roommate leaves their dishes in the sink AGAIN! The luxuries of going solo are pretty sweet. No more mysteriously vanishing food or the unsolicited “borrowing” of your favorite jacket, and definitely no need to wear pants (praise be). While living on your own has major perks, it also comes with some serious responsibilities. Wanting your own place and being ready for your own place aren’t exactly the same phase of life. So, before you lock in that lease, consider these seven things a diploma on the readiness to live by yourself. 1. You can afford it. Photo Cred This sounds harsh, but evictions aren’t sexy and definitely don’t boost your dating profile. Calculate your expenses. Figure out how much you spend monthly vs. how much you make monthly. This is a good way to gauge how much spending power you have when looking for your own place. 2. You aren’t scared to sacrifice. Photo Cred You may have an idea of the ideal unit for you, but you aren’t afraid to sacrifice granite counter tops for an easier commute to work at a reasonable price. For you, it’s all about the bigger picture and getting the best bang for your buck. 3. You have a furniture/home goods plan. Photo Cred We all have that friend that moved out and slept on an air mattress for six months, and…

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to roomie or not to roomie friends

Fresh Grads: Do You Really Need A Roommate?

By | Apartments, Houston, Roommates

If you’re a fresh grad looking for a new place in Houston (or anywhere, really), you’re probably chatting with friends, wondering if you should take that next step and become roomies! It’s a valid question and we’ve all been there before! On one hand, you could have an amazing relationship with your roomie. What’s better than having a built-in going out buddy? Well…there’s also the chance they down your kombucha when you’re at work or commandeer the freezer with frozen meals they never actually make. It could go either way, which makes you a bit nervous about signing a lease with someone. Before you go running into a lease with the girl who complimented your shoes in the coffee shop last week or running for the hills to live alone in the woods, Thoreau-style, take a step back and think to yourself: Do I need a roommate? Cred ROOMIES: Who Needs ‘Em? Well, a good amount of people actually. In Houston, the average starting salary for a Bachelor’s Degree holdin’ graduate is about $29-33k annually. If we were to go with the higher end of that range, that would come to around $2,750 a month before taxes. Now, virtually all properties want you to make at least 3 times your rent each month. Meaning, that brings your budget, using the average starting salary, to around $900 a month. But let’s say that you find a roomie…now your rent budget goes up to at least $1,800 for a two bedroom. The options that open up…

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